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Cashmer Pashmina

Kashmir i Shawl  ( Cashmere ) The Royal Touch

A shawl is a simple item of clothing, loosely worn over the shoulders, upper body and arms, and sometimes also over the head. It is usually a rectangular or square piece of cloth, which is often folded to make a triangle but can also be triangular in shape. Other shapes include oblong shawls

Shawl and pashmina

Shawl and pashmina name comes from Kashmir, but it originates from Hamedan Persia. Sources consider Cashmere crafts were introduced by Sayeed Ali Hamadani In the 14th century Mir Ali Hamadani came to Ladakh, home land of pashmina goats where, for the first time in history he found that the Ladakhi Kashmiri goats produced soft wool. He took some of this goat wool and made socks which he gave as a gift to king of Kashmir, Sultan Qutabdin. Afterwards Hamadani suggested to the king that they start a shawl weaving industry in Kashmir using this wool. That is how pashmina shawls began.The United national specialized agency UNESCO reported in 2014 that Ali Hamadani was one of the principal historical figures who shaped the culture of Kashmir, both architecturally and also through the flourishing of arts and crafts and hence economy in Kashmir. The skills and knowledge that he brought to Kashmir gave rise to an entire industry.

 

      Shawls are hand spun, and woven in Kashmir and also in Nepal, and made from fine cashmere fiber to worth it .

Kashmir shawl, also spelled Cashmere, type of woolen shawl woven in Kashmir. According to tradition, the founder of the industry was Zayn-ul-Aabidin, a 15th-century ruler of Kashmir who introduced weavers from Turkistan. Although woolen shawls were mentioned in writings of the 3rd century BC and the 11th century ad, it is only in the 16th century that the first specific references to Kashmir work appeared.

The earliest examples have a plain ground with end borders featuring large floral sprays, flower vases, and pine cones. Kashmir shawls are woven partly or wholly from goat hair called pashm. In the 19th century, shawls were classified as pashm  shāla (made from the hair of domesticated goats) and aslī tūsh (made from the hair of wild goats). By this time, kashmir shawls had also become fashionable in Europe. In response to foreign tastes, the traditional designs were replaced by or adapted to patterns supplied by foreign dealers. France and Great Britain established mechanized shawl industries, one of the most important centres being Paisley, Scot., where the kashmir—or, rather, cashmere—shawl was imitated and woven entirely by machine. This cheaply produced article offered keen competition to the genuine one and forced Kashmir weavers to compromise on quality and to imitate the designs of the Paisley workshops. These efforts were unsuccessful, and, by about 1870, the Kashmir industry had almost collapsed. A strong effort began in the mid-20th century to revive the industry under government patronage

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